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​​New NHS health app for young people in the borough of Richmond


Young people aged 16 to 24 in the borough of Richmond can now download trusted NHS health and wellbeing advice and information direct to their mobile phones and tablets via a new app called NHS Go.

The free and confidential health app has been developed to help young people take greater control over their health from an early age; make healthier choices and get trusted advice on health issues when they don’t know where to go.

NHS Go [www.nhsgo.uk] has been developed by Healthy London Partnership, a partnership between all 32 London Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), including Richmond CCG, and NHS England (London region). 

The app was created in collaboration with young people to find out what they needed to improve their access to relevant health information and advice. Young people have helped create the app, test it and worked with us on the campaign to promote it. The app uses content from the NHS Choices website, which has been adapted to suit a younger audience.

Dr Graham Lewis, local GP and chair of Richmond Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), said: “The app provides young people with a quick and easy way to get health information and advice that is tailored to their age group. Young people told us they wanted a trusted and private way of accessing information about their health concerns, in addition to talking to a professional, and NHS Go does just that.”

Professor Russell Viner, Clinical Director at Healthy London Partnership and a Consultant in Adolescent Medicine, said: “Today is a great day for London’s one million young people. NHS Go is the first app of its kind in London. It’s dedicated to giving young people free online access to health information via the app and website.

“London has one of the youngest populations in the country and we know that today’s young Londoners face very unique and distinct challenges. Young people often lack basic knowledge of how to access healthcare services with many not knowing when or how to go about seeing a doctor.

“Adolescence is a critical time for laying the foundation for good health and wellbeing in adulthood as we know that many life-long health behaviours are set during this time.

“We’ve worked closely with youth organisations and young people from across London to develop a tool that helps them to better manage their health. They have told us that they want better access to health services and information without the challenge of having to trawl through endless pages of irrelevant information. NHS Go provides authenticated NHS choices information to young people in ways that want it and are most likely to use it.”

The app has been launched with support from some of London’s best known young youtube vloggers, who star in a new short film​ encouraging young people in London to download and use the app.

YouTube-vlogger, Riyadh Khalf who was involved with the NHS Go campaign said: “I remember being in my teens and feeling this deep routed anxiety over anything to do with my health and changes that naturally occurs in a young person’s body. At the time all I had to go by was dodgy information passed around from friends. I feel that NHS Go is an invaluable tool for young Londoners to take their health into their own hands without fear or stigma embarrassment and I hope that they go out and use it. "The app can be downloaded from Apple store and Goggle Play.

It includes a built in A-Z tool which makes it quick and easy for young people to navigate and find the information or service they need. It also neither stores nor shares search history, giving young people the freedom to search in confidence. 

Notes to editors: 
  • NHS Go is a free app available to download from Apple store and Goggle Play.
  • 15 per cent of London's population is aged 13-24 – 1,200,000 million.
  • Between 10 – 24 years young people move to become independent users of health care.  
  • Many young people don't know when or why to see a doctor, don't know how to see a doctor and can find the process of registering with a GP confusing. 
  • 300,000 young women and 168,000 young men in London took at one prescribed medicine in the previous week.
  • Approximately 200,000 teenagers in London suffer from asthma.​